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for president in 2015 that was involved in benghazi? hillary clinton or joe biden maybe biden has stock in paramount. it's always chancy when you're in hollywood to make a movie in a run up to an election. you probably remember during the last election the of about "zero dark thirty" that was a movie about taking out bin laden. the producers that make the movie, because the buzz was that is going to become this is going to be kind of an obama commercial for reelection. than the producers were so concerned about that and they were so concerned about the negative impact on the film but they went around washington in the with congressional leaders and think tanks. i spent about two hours 20 running for now this is not a pro-obama movie. and in the end of out of postponing the release of the film until after the election so wouldn't get all tight in the election. it's always chancy from a film maker standpoint is do you really want to jump in politics when you try to make a film which tells the ground truth? there's a couple of options. you can go to the "zero dark thirty" read and should w
. he lost in 1992 to bill clinton. clinton wins with 43% of the vote roughly, that was it. because of the third party candidacy of who? ross perot. clinton didn't get over 50% of the vote. george bush gets in without winning a majority of votes and then 2004 the second bush testimony, bush leaves office, bush around 2007 had the worst gallup approval numbers of any president since harry truman. barack obama. obama wins in 2008. 2012 obama actually is the first president in history -- though he was the first democrat, i believe, since lbj to get over 50% of the vote -- but in 2012 he was elected with, first president to do this, elected with less popular votes and electoral college votes in his re-election. reagan won 49 out of 50 states in his re-election, obama won 26. a bare majority. and if you look at a map of counties, right, under reagan it was a sea of red. under obama it was still a sea of red. if you look, if you look at counties. and speaking, speaking of obama, there was a poll done in 2013 after the 2013 -- after the second inaugural which asked americans if ronald reag
clinton. he won 43 percent of the vote because of the third-party candidate of ross perot. clinton 1986 did not get over 50 percent come the 2000 george to be bush gets in without even winning a majority then 2004 the second bush term peaveys office said in 2007 had the worst gallup approval numbers since truman. obama 2008. 2012 obama is the first president in history the first democrat since lbj to get over 50 percent but 2012 he was elected with less popular votes than electoral college votes. reagan won 49 added 50 states obama had 26. but they are majority. looking at the map of counties under reagan was the sea of red under obama still a sea of red. speaking of obama, there was a pulled the in 2013 after the 20,132nd inaugural that asked americans if ronald reagan were to run today against barack obama who food you vote for? reagin. 58%. right after his election here is what is really fascinating who elected it was the use felt they would ask pate -- people who would you vote for? they would pick ronald reagan. . . to put in whichever name they wanted. who is the greatest american
that was really going nowhere and they moved o'rielly to 8:00 p.m. during the clinton monica lewinsky scandal and overly connected with this audience who was outraged at bill clinton and overly sense the drama of the story and his ability to get his guests to engage in his fiery interviewing style. i describe in the book as an irish street cop. he has an ability to laser in on what the issue is. that's a testament to o'rielly's center. he is the highest rated show on fox. he can do what he wants and ailes jokes that o'rielly uses his show to sell looks and promote himself. it really is because ailes has this respect for o'rielly is a self-made man. >> host: or riley has come out of ways on immigration and gun control. you said because he is powerful powerful -- >> guest: he can do what he wants and he has his own audience. o'rielly really is an interesting, he is essentially the one talent at fox with some exceptions with sean hannity who is very different. john hannity is very much in lockstep with what roger ailes wants. bill shine who is roger ailes or graham deputy was for years sean hann
-year itch. i was there in 1998 and bill clinton defied the odds. these campaigns are going to be very competitive, tough, but at the end of the day i still believe the democrats will retain control of the senate. unfortunately, from a mathematical point of you what you did not make him in college, let me just say, it's tough to take back the house given the gerrymandered nature of the district. democrats have over 1 million more votes and republicans in 2012 and yet we only captured 47% of the seats. we have an opportunity to take back some of the gubernatorial seats. while two-thirds of the american people did not bother to vote in 2010 which is why the tea party took over, i think 2014 will be a year where you see a resurgence of democratic voters going back to the polls to vote. >> ralph, your take on this? since you mentioned the tea party, we have primaries in texas today and tea party candidates is not looking very good. >> right. first of all let me say to those of you are here for the policy conference, thank you for all that you and aipac do every day. i've been working -- [a
the clinton and monica lewinsky scandal and o'reilly can did with this audience was outraged and he said thatdrama of the story and to aspire the style i described them in the book as almost like an irish street cop to please her in on what the issue is. so i think that is a testament to the power center and he has the numbers he has the highest rated show and i it is the lincf the prime time lineup. and ailes jokes that o'reilly uses the show to sell his books and promote himself, but it's because ailes has a respect that o'reilly is a self-made man. >> host: o'reilly has come out in ways that you are describing on immigration and on gun control. you're saying because he is powerful -- >> guest: there are a factor of viewers. they have some exception. they are in lockstep with what they want and it's interesting to note the programming deputy and it's that line between sean hannity where he can get what he wants on the air through hanni hannity. >> host: let's come back to a couple things about the election. there is a famous moment where karl rove's who's been on fox is raising money a
enough at the end of his tenure president clinton pardoned a bunch of them one of the policeman who was there at the time said they all felt lucky that day. one of the others, a newspaper reporter reported this happen during a routine traffic stop. both of those accounts are really incorrect. it was really mrs. walter jacobsen and i have been unable to even find her first name, completely obscure case now but she broke an attempted robbery of the greatest importance by hardened terrorists who all went to jail thanks to her intervention. so you know that phrase now. it started in new york as a nationwide push by the department of homeland security that if you see something say something. i like the phrase and i think it captures well the sense that we as citizens have both a duty and opportunity to be citizens in cases that do touch him specific security. i like the slogan more than i do some which have more emphasis. for example you'll often see signs around military bases that say if you see anything that looks at all suspicious immediately report to authoritiauthoriti s. i would t
this story about monuments clinton needs to be told and why i have been so excited to share it with everybody because it is a story that is near and dear to all our hearts. his book is an interesting book but there is a lot to the story. not with looting of works of art but the damage is done with the appearance of the united states, with people around the world seems that we didn't care about these cultural treasures, some even accuse us of not caring because they were not judeo-christian in nature which was nonsense. wasn't a priority target it should have been because we didn't know about the legacy we inherited from world war ii. >> host: i know this isn't your area of expertise the we're coming upon hundred anniversary of world war i. was there any effort or wide scale looting in world war i? >> guest: there was certainly damage to cultural treasures and i right about that in saving it lee because the monument fine arts and archive section was not the first time this ever been done. actually another of the paradoxes, the first formalized effort to protect works of art was a german effort
port clinton, ohio. population then and now 5,000. c-span: what was the family like? >> guest: my family? c-span: mm-hmm. >> guest: my dad was a--a building contractor. my mom was a schoolteacher. we'd come there after the war. my dad had been injured during the war and he was recovering. and i had a--a younger sister--still do. and it was a--it was a pleasant place to grow up and a pleasant time to grow up. and, i mean, i--it was a much less, you know, cosmopolitan place than harvard or--or the east coast in general. but i was really blessed in growing up in a place that had a lot of social capital. and, frankly, i've--i've spent some time learning in writing this book about the degree to which what i'm indulging in here is simple nostalgia for kind of a--of a--of a past that one wouldn't necessarily today want to re-create. i haven't been back to port clinton for a long time--until i--until just recently i went back there. and it turns out it still is, in fact, unusually civic. people do--do connect with one another. c-span: you do mention that, in spite of the fact that you fin
for president clinton. i kind of thought that was a sham. but that didn't compare to what happened today. the vote on debo adegbile to be assistant attorney general for civil rights sent a strong message. here's the message we sent tod today. you young people, listen you. -- you young people, listen up. if you are a young white person and you go to work for a law firm. you're a lawyer, sworn in to the ball, you go to work for a law firm. you're a white person. and that law firm defends you to a pro bono case to defend someone who killed eight people in cold blood and they assign you to defend that person. my advice from this, what happened today, is you should do that. it's part of your legal obligation, part of your profession. because if you do that, who knows, you might wind up to be the chief justice of the united states supreme court. however, if you are a young black person and you go to work for the naacp legal defense fund and they assign you under your obligations as an attorney, in keeping with your oath of office, they assign you to appeal a case of someone who committed a hei
were constantly not only fighting bill clinton, the president at that time, but fight against some of the things our old leadership was doing because we didn't come back to be just a mindless lemon for the elephant over the donkey, but came back with value, and that was to get our government spending down to live within our means, to get fair taxes that don't ruin people's businesses and their lives, and we believe the things the republican party had been saying. that was our big crime, but they called us a big boy republican, and now to be referred to as a tea party patriot makes my life easier. didn't like the bad boy republican thing, but i just want you to know what brought me back because i left for 12 years, and when i left, having set term limits, i never thought i would come back to congress again, because when i left, we had actually balanced the budget for the first time in 40 # years. in 1998, we balanced the budget. 1999, we blnsed the budget, and in 2000, not only was it balanced, but had a 240 billion some surplus. the frl budget was 1.7 trillion. i fast forward, i'm
the clinton administration 20 years ago with respect to the balkansment massive human suffering, in that case it was genocide. more three years the world looked away, then it started to get out of of control. there's people here who know the story much better than i do, but then finally after three years, you know, clinton decided to get involved and to his credit, you know, no one is dying in boss any ca today. now, it's far from a perfect situation, and one can sort of look back, and i personally have sort of a lot of criticism of the dayton plan, but one of good things that happened because of u.s. leadership was that part of the world was turned around. and so, and the plan that was put in place was a political solution. it involved military intervention, but with it also had a political arrangement, you know, integrated within the entire package. so i think if syria is going to be turned around, we need something similar. but none of that, of course, will happen unless there is leadership that can only come from this country. >> the worst part, the worst group among the extremists is isi
. shapiro has served in many roles in the white house starting when she worked in the clinton white house as special assistant and counselor to the president for southern european -- southeastern european stabilization and reconstruction. she's also served at the national security council developing and coordinating economic security policies. previously, she was of a member of secretary of state's policy planning staff and worked in the office of the legal adviser where she helped negotiate the dayton peace accords that ended the war in bosnia. jeff shatt is a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. mr. shatt joined the peterson institute in 1983 and is a senior fellow working on international trade policy and economic sanctions. during his tenure at the institute, shatt was also a visiting lecturer at princeton university and georgetown university. he was a senior associate at the carnegie endowment for international peace, and prior to joining peterson, jeff was an official at the u.s. treasury department from 1974 to 1982. in international trade and energy
to do with it. she was ambassador to the united nations. and secretary clinton was, quote, exhausted i believe was the rationale given why she wasn't on every sunday morning show. so the fact is that we knew at the time -- susan rice said -- and this is what it really was all about. it was all about a president deption campaign -- presidential campaign and the narrative that bin laden is dead, al qaeda is on the run. because then susan rice, in response to bob schieffer, said, "president obama said when he was running for president that he would refocus our efforts and attentions on al qaeda." and then she said, get this, "we've decimated al qaeda. bin laden is gone. he also said we would end the war in iraq responsibly. we've done that. close quote. is there anybody here who thinks that the war in iraq has been ended responsibly? "he has protected civilians in libya and qadhafi is gone." so, obviously, we have not decimated al qaeda. al qaeda is not on the run. in fact, al qaeda is increasing everywhere across the middle east and north africa. and anybody who believes that when the bl
11 of us constantly having to not only fight bill clinton was the president but fight against some of the things that our leaders were doing. we did not come back to be some mind the slumming. we actually came back with values, to get government spending down, live within our means committee of fair taxes that don't ruin businesses. and we actually believe the things that the republican party had been singing. they call this the bad boy republicans. now to be for two as the tea party patriot it makes my wife a lot easier. she did not like the bad boy republican thing. amelie to know what brought me back. i left for 12 years. when i left i never thought i would come back to congress again. when i left the in actually balance the budget for the first time in 40 years. not only do they balance the budget billion at june june $47 billion surplus. when i fast forward, and none of it for 12 years. i see what happens in 2010, glorious patriots standing up and fighting in against the most tyrannical president of we ever had in the history of america. and my juices start flowing. d'agata en
with me. host: you became the ins commissioner during the clinton administration? guest: yes. fw librarian tweets in -- what would be the policy implications of that? i think that is not going to happen. congress will not do that. a durable system for a long time. if people are here illegally for , they are eligible to apply for citizenship as long as they have not violated any laws, have learned to speak english, and are familiar with the civics and system of government of our country. that is a system that has proved very, very effective. people whoe putting are here as noncitizens into a legal framework where they can do that. right now, we have a very large population that is prevented from doing that. yes, they have violated the law. yes, they should be accountable for that. but at the end of the day, it is unrealistic to imagine that we can remove them all from the country and a large share of them are contributing to our economy, to our communities in positive ways. of thelizabeth grieco census bureau, from all of the stats you have gathered here, what are the trends going forward?
, clinton decided to get involved and to his credit, you know, no one is dying in bosnia today. it's far from a perfect situation. one can look back and i personally have a lot of criticism of the plan. one of the good things that happened because of u.s. leadership was that part of the world was turned around. the plan put in place was a political solution involved military but a political arrangement none will happen unless there is leadership. leadership that can only come from the country. >> the worse part -- the worse group among the extremist is the isis an this is more than 90% come -- composed of foreign fighters. if at least you get the syrians to agree on a transitional government and steps toward, they can deal with the foreigners among them. it's a big security challenge, but then once they are unified and agreed on a move forward, they can take care of isis. the latest news is already -- that it is falling back from some of the areas which the -- >> yeah. they benefit from the chaos and the insecurity that is, you know, characterizing syria. once there's an alternative in p
remains extremely important. i think i secretary clinton, secretary kerry, the president of the training has had on so many occasions that this will not in military. there ought to be some way for reconciliation to be possible. the second principle as well, which is i always felt in the time i had this responsibility, and this kind of diplomacy has got to be backed by force. it isn't necessarily backed by american force but this, idea if you're in gave of reconciliation is another reason to be in favor of a sign to be bsa. another favor for american forces and international forces and it's a very important reason to be in favor of continued support for afghan national security forces it seems to me that taliban is watching very carefully how we work our way through these next few months to decide whether be any pressure on them to make this step toward reconciliation so the effect of the military effort, international and afghan, still is really important third point seems to me on reconciliation as you look back and circling makes you think about it very carefully and watching the film
that the president and the then secretary of state hillary clinton would stand in front of all of us as citizens and blatantly lie to us about what happened in benghazi and now, we look at hillary clinton as most likely the 2016 democrat candidate for president and who in later testimony came out and said, what difference does it make that four americans are dead. i would like to ask you, from your perspective, what difference does that make to us? >> you know, like i said, it makes a huge difference to us because we don't want more dead americans and more widows in the future and the fact that your, protecting your personal politics is more important than getting to ground truth, so we can make sure we do things right in the future, to me that is the ultimate act of despickability. look, you don't like president bush. fine, i get that. i can tell you every, within a month of 9/11, i can tell you every single thing president bush did every moment of the day of 9/11. i still can't tell you what president obama did on his day of 9/11. i can tell you this he has not learned his lesson. just yesterd
by president clinton and became law, enacted 20 years ago. one thing i want to do is to encourage everybody in the future who is working on the future and it is important include all sales in background checks and you heard the reason why, seven examples. i want to encourage everybody that just because there is public outcry doesn't mean we will get a bill passed. it takes work and it takes time and it takes persistence and with that we will win again. i have no doubt whatsoever. i want to come over here, the day it passes. i promise and won't leave until then. [applause] >> and jim wanted me to show a big hello, sorry we couldn't be here today. it is a little hard for him to travel any more. for those who helped us, thank you so very much. for those on the brady staff, the president and everybody else, i see they have the same enthusiasm and zweibel finish the job. [applause] >> the success you achieved, reminders, and continuing that legacy. and our pursuit of this change. those charged with the protection and safety in communities, no support is more important for extended background che
on february 3, 2000, by vice president joe biden. in 1997, mr. holder was named by president clinton to be the deputy attorney general. prior to that he served as u.s. attorney for the district of colombia. in 1988, mr. holder was nominated by president reagan to become an associate judge for the supreme court of the district of columbia. prior to becoming attorney general, mr. holder was a litigation partner in washington. it truly in need is a pleasure imposed up here to address is here again today, general. [applause] >> well, good morning. hello? good morning and thank you for those kind words. we're going high-tech issue. i use the command have my speech but i want to thank you for your dedicated service over a good number of years. we're all wondering what's next. were just talking about that as we're walking through, but thank you for great leadership in wisconsin and your great leadership for this organization. it's a privilege to take part in this important meeting. i'd like to thank naag's leadership team and professional staff for bringing us together this week and invitin
ambassador, can you tell us what prompted the clinton administration to want to have these reports produced and what was the outcome of the reports click here i done an enormous service in his book that i want to try to put it in an even broader context. and that is is a great job you do not only to the monument to the united states army. and the united states of america. contrast this enormous effort to the cultural property to get it returned to its rightful owners. with the action of the soviet union coming from the east to berlin, and they were intent on doing just the opposite, stripping germany, stripping its museums of everything that they could. it was movable and taking it back to russia as the competition for the enormous losses. so here we are doing exactly the opposite of trying to preserve and get it back to its original owners when the soviets are trying to compensate themselves for their losses. with respect to the report, we had lawsuits being brought against the swiss banks and we began to realize there was a broad story then the amount put in the swiss banks by victims. an
diplomatic troubleshooter in the u.s. government. he was the clinton and george w. bush administration's special envoy for afghanistan, kosovo, bosnia, haiti, and somalia. all the global garden spots, he hit them all. he, his work has involved him intimately in the withdrawal of u.s. forces from somalia. the american-led multilateral intervention in haiti, stabilization and reconstruction of bosnia and the nato intervention in kosovo. he is truly "a man for all seasons" and is a good friend. after september 11th, 2001, ambassador dobbins was appointed as the bush administration's representative to the afghan opposition with the task of putting together a broadly-based successor to the ousted taliban regime. he represented the united states at the bonn conference that established a new afghan government an on december 16th, 2001, he raised the flag over the newly reopened u.s. embassy in kabul. i can't think of a better person to be entrusted with guiding u.s. policy through the challenges and opportunities of the political inand security transition in in afghanistan. ambassador dobbins
. the problem is other administrations including the bush administration and the clinton administration did not include turn backs at the border as a part of their deportation numbers. so to say that you're setting records when comparing oranges and oranges is simply not accurate. if you look at interior deportations, they are down 40% since 2009. the you agree with that, generally speaking? you may need to check that i realize, but i look at the figures and they are down 40%. so for this administration to say it's breaking records and removing individuals, is simply not accurate. if you any comment on that you're welcome to make it. >> i would have to look at the numbers myself. my understanding, which could be wrong, is that consistent with prior administrations we have be ported the overall numbers, but that with respect to the last report, we broke out within that overall number the number of those who were border arrests. >> again, the problem with this administration is that there including the turn backs and the removals by the border patrol at the border, and previous administration
president george h. w. bush, former president clinton, former president carter. it was a terrific event that the president enjoyed very much. he spoke at that event. as you know, the president was joined other force one. the president very much enjoyed being able to see some of the art that president bush has worked on. [inaudible question] >> the full exhibit -- >> mercy of. [laughter] >> to see at all desire it to be fully on display. >> well, i don't have any travel announcements to make, but i am a layperson, not an art expert. i'm pretty impressed by the president's work. i think it is fascinating. if there is, i did not know that he was making in exhibit out of the library had a value and interest of is in the library. >> given the national outcry from business leaders, mitt romney, newt gingrich, and the president's window of opportunity to make a statement by extending the executive order >> i don't have any update on that matter. we, of course, hope very much that further action will be taken in congress on the employment nondiscrimination act , an act -- a bill that it became
to years later. it was signed by president clinton and became law 20 years ago. i want to encourage everybody in the future that is working on this important issue, and it is important to include all sales in the background checks and you have just heard the reasons by, several examples of the internet and gun shows. i want to encourage everybody that just because there is public outcry doesn't mean we will get the bill passed. it takes work, time, and it takes persistance and we will will again. it will be a proud day. and i am going to come back the day it passes and i promise i will not leave until then. [ applause ] >> and jim wanted me to give everybody a big hello. he is sorry he could not be here. but it is hard for him to travel anymore. for those of you who helped us, thank you so very much. for those of you on the brady staff, dan, president and everybody else working on it, i see they have got the same excitement so we are going to win and we are going to finish the job. thank you. [ applause ] >> thank you, sarah. one of the more inspiring things, in addition to the succ
years reaching out to vladimir putin, it was called the reset policy started by hillary clinton. about two years ago that policy ended. so the reset has been over to. it's well over, everybody knows that, both sides know that. so this is not the end of the u.s./russia reset. this is, like, the middle of the next phase already. so we should be clear about that. as for whether or not obama's weakness emboldens those around the world, that's not 100% fair. my take on it is this: the obama administration always had a broad vision and an ideology that included bringing the u.s. out of the position of active control of all of the world's conflicts, right? they don't believe that america has the preeminent role to play in every situation in the world. they do believe america should be the world's leader, and it's a distinction, but it's an important one. so you can look at that and say that that has left a vacuum for other powers to fill and that, i think, is fair, but weakness is sort of pejorative, and it doesn't really reflect the thoughtfulness that actually goes into the obama administra
remains extremely important. i think as secretary clinton, secretary kerry and the president of the united states has seven so many locations that this war is an going to end militarily and there's political into this conflict. there ought to be some way to see if reconciliation is possible. but there is a second principle as well which is i always felt in the time that i had this responsibility this kind of diplomacy ought to be backed by force and it doesn't necessarily have to be backed by american force that this idea is if you're in favor of reconciliation is another reason to be in favor of the bsa and another reason to be in favor of american and international forces in afghanistan on january 1, 2015 and it's a very important reason to be in favor of continued support for the afghan national security forces. it seems to me the taliban is watching very carefully how we work our way through these next few months to decide whether there will be any pressure on them to make this step towards reconciliation. so the effective military efforn is still really important. the third seems to
of decisions we made today and knowing i think hillary clinton as she runs isn't going to be on defense i'm looking forward to a fairly robust presidential race itch i hope will reallocate the need for that international affairs. we know there are competing elements in both political parties but don't want to hear that and they do want to do nationbuilding at home and i understand that argument that i think we need a rebalancing on that one as well. in summary, president obama has a better foreign-policy than he himself acknowledges, and he should actually based the ukraine policy on the need to prove that america is re- engaging because the state skier i think are simply too high, and the risk of making the wrong decision to hire to use ukraine as a litmus test for leadership to fix serious policy and then he made ukraine on its own merits. point number two and this is intended as an attempt to get at the worldview of vladimir putin and it's been haunting me the last couple days so i'm going to burden you with my view what is the analogy for putin? in american foreign policy to what he's
clinton had made statements urging passage of a hate crime bill that was stalled in congress. let me just say a tiny bit about the context. the attack on matthew shepard happened just four months after the dragging death of james bird junior in jasper texas so there was a hate crime bill that was stalled in congress at the time this attack on matthew happened here in laramie. i will go back to my arrival here. i arrived in the courthouse and asked to look at documents and you know reams of paper and egg files came out and i started to go through those records and take notes during this first trip. i was fortunate that day cal rerucha was walking around the county attorney's office and i had recognized him because i had seen them in the news stories and i just approached them and i said would you talk with me for a few minutes about the case? he agreed and i went into his office and we spoke that first day for about 45 minutes. it was very clear that he was sizing up my intentions not just them but in the months that followed. he told me he wanted nothing to do with anything that would inf
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)